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Tuesday, June 30, 2009

Glickman's Four Different Approaches to Mentoring Teachers


*Carl D. Glickman (2002) has identified the following four different approaches to mentoring teachers:

-The directive-control approach

-The directive-informational approach

-The collaborative approach

-The nondirective approach

* Glickman, C. D. (2002). Leadership for Learning: How to Help Teachers Succeed.Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Explanations and sample dialogues of the above four approaches to mentoring follow in future posts.

Monday, June 29, 2009

What is the Difference Between a Supervisor and a Mentor?


In this section of the blog we are discussing “clinical supervision”. Heretofore, the persons responsible for clinical supervision in a Jewish school were the principal, the school director, or a designated supervisor, (i.e. not the mentor teacher). They (i.e. the principal, school director, or supervisor) use the clinical supervision model with the three-step conference cycle to provide teachers/mentees with formative and summative feedback. Formative feedback is the specific technical, corrective, constructive positive, and constructive negative information that the observer gives the pre-service or in-service teacher. Formative feedback is only concerned with providing the teacher with assessment data to improve his or her professional practice. It is not given to determine the future status of the pre-service or in-service teacher. That is, whether (a) the pre-service teacher will be certified, or (b) the in-service teacher will be rehired, conditionally rehired, promoted, or terminated. Summative feedback, on the other hand, is the final assessment of the mentee's professional growth as a pre-service or in-service teacher. It is used to determine whether the pre-service teacher will be certified, or the in-service teacher will be rehired or promoted. The principal, school director, or supervisor gives both formative and summative feedback to in-service teachers. The mentor teacher, on the other hand, only provides formative feedback to in-service teachers, but both formative and summative feedback to pre-service teachers.

On the next post we will be introducing four approaches to mentoring teachers according to Carl D. Glickman.

Friday, June 26, 2009

Three-Step Clinical Supervision/Mentoring Conference Cycle




The Essential Components of the Clinical Supervision or Mentoring are contained in the Three- Step Conference Cycle

Step One: The Co-Planning Conference

The co-planning conference is the first meeting between the pre-service or in-service teacher (i.e. mentee) and the mentor or supervisor. The purposes for the co-planning conference are as follows:

1. Establish rapport and trust

2. Assist the mentee in planning a personal focus for the classroom observation, or assist him or her in applying one or more teaching techniques without classroom observation

3. Discuss the student-teacher/classroom management relationship

4. Establish procedures for observation

5. Solicit feedback from the mentee on handling the co-planning and post-observation conference

6. Offer continuous support

Step Two: The Classroom Observation

The mentor or supervisor and the mentee discuss what kind of observation instrument/s will be used and the focus for the observation. They may also decide to modify the observation instrument so that it targets what is in the best interest of the mentee's development.

Step Three: The Post-Observation Feedback Conference

The post-observation feedback conference is designed (a) to give the pre-service or in-service teacher (i.e. mentee) objective feedback on the focus of the observation, and (b) to validate those effective teaching practices the mentee demonstrated during the lesson.

On the next post we will discuss the major differences between a supervisor and a mentor.

Thursday, June 25, 2009

Clinical Supervision


What is Clinical Supervision?

Clinical supervision is the generic term that describes the process by which a supervisor or mentor helps develop the in-service or pre-service teacher.

Models for Clinical Supervision

There are several different models for clinical supervision. For example, the clinical supervision model of *M. Cogan (1973), contains the following eight steps:

1. Establish a helping and trusting relationship.

2. Plan lessons and units with the teacher.

3. Plan for the observation.

4. Observe instruction.

5. Analyze the data to find significant patterns in the delivery of instruction.

6. Plan for the clinical conference.

7. Conference to review the classroom event.

8. Plan for the next steps (e.g. teacher and supervisor assignments, next observation, etc.).

*Cogan, M. L (1973). Clinical Supervision. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin.

The clinical supervision model of *Glickman, Gordon, and Ross-Gordon (2001) consists of these five steps:

1. Pre-conference with the teacher.

2. Observation of the classroom.

3. Analyzing and interpreting the observation, and determining the approach toward conferencing.

4. Post-conference with the teacher.

5. Critique of the previous four steps.

In all these clinical supervision models, the essential component is the three-step conference cycle, and that will be the subject our the next post.

*Glickman, C. D., Gordon, S. P., & Ross-Gordon, J. M. (2001) (5th ed.) SuperVision and Instructional Leadership: A Developmental Approach. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Four Wide Lens Observation Techniques

The mentor and mentee may want to use wide lens observation techniques for data gathering to give the mentee a larger picture of what happens in the classroom. There are many wide lens data gathering techniques including:

-Videotaping: record the lesson via a videotape machine.

-Audiotaping: record the lesson via an audiotape machine.

-Verbatim Dictation or script taping: record, in writing, the entire lesson.

-Selective Verbatim Dictation or selective script taping: record in writing critical parts of the lesson.

On the next post we will present a summary of the different observation instruments and techniques we have discussed in the blog.

Monday, June 22, 2009

The Rabbinic School of the Jewish Theological Seminary Incorporates Mentoring into its Program.


http://www.jtsa.edu/x905.xml#elements Click on to this web address and learn about the Rabbinical School of the Jewish Theological Seminary (JTS) which highlights mentoring into its program. The site includes information on these topics: mentor training, setting up internships, the role of the mentor, written reflections, the elements of mentoring, evaluating the students, and the hard to reach student.

Time, Observation, Comments Observation Form



Here is the Time, Observation, Comments Observation Form.

Time

Observation

Comments














On the next post we will share four wide lens observation techniques.

Friday, June 19, 2009

Standard Observation Form


Here is a Standard Observation Form.


Things I Like

Things I Have Questions About

Comments and Suggestions
























On the next post we will share four wide lens observation techniques.





Thursday, June 18, 2009

Special Announcement: Program to Inspire the Next Generation of Jewish Educators, HEMSHECH


The Jewish Educational Services division of the UJA Federation of Northern New Jersey (UJANNJ) has a program to inspire the next generation of Jewish educators. The program is called HEMSHECH (i.e. continuation) and is an elective course for motivated candidates who wish to become a Jewish teacher (e.g. those who tutor younger students, run a Shabbat group, or work as a camp counselor). In the course these topics are discussed:

-classroom management

-lesson planning and

-active learning instructional techniques

In addition, HEMSHECH participants

-Observe classroom teachers in action in area Day Schools

-Visit North New Jersey’s own Jewish Teachers’ Center

-View teacher educator videos

-Create and teach their own teaching game and lesson

-Upon successful completion of the course students receive a Certificate of Achievement from Jewish Educational Services of the UJANNJ.

To learn more about HEMSHECH contact Minna H. Heilpern at MinnaH@ujannj.org .

Sample Teacher Observation Template




Atop please find a Sample Teacher Observation Template with boxes indicating different focus areas. The mentor and the mentee are encouraged to modify the focus areas for observation by changing the words written in the boxes.











On the next post we will share a simple, yet elegant observation form.

Wednesday, June 17, 2009

Sample Application of The Teacher Movement Observation Form




Atop please find a sample application of the Teacher Movement Observation Form.Note that the lines with the arrows reflect where the teacher moves in the classroom. The hash marks represent the number of times the teacher moves to that area in the classroom.


On the next post we will share A Sample Observation Template.

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Sample and Application of Another Teacher to Student and Student to Student Verbal Flow Chart Observation Instrument




Here are two additional observations instruments. The top one reflects the seating arrangement in a classroom. The bottom instrument diagrams the verbal interactions among the teacher and the students.





















On the next post we will share a sample and application of The Teacher Movement Observation Instrument.

Monday, June 15, 2009

Application of the Teacher to Student, and Student to Student Verbal Flow Form




On your left is a sample Teacher to Student, and Student to Student Verbal Flow Form.

On the next post we will share another Teacher to Teacher, and Student to Student Verbal Flow Form.






Friday, June 12, 2009

Suggested Methods to Encourage Your Mentee To Participate in Collegial Reflection Practices






In this blog we have suggested that a mentor teacher needs to possess three sets of core skills and practices in his or her repertoire:


1. Social or relationship competencies

2. Competencies in internal and external reflection

3. Skills in applying different observational tools

There is a multitude of observation instruments from which a mentor teacher can choose. We have selected a few that are user friendly. The first one we will share is the Sample On-Task Observation Form. It is depicted at the top of this post.

Name of the Observation

Instrument

Purpose for the Observation Instrument

How the Observational

Instrument Is Used

Sample-On Task Observation Form

To identify the on-and off-task behavior of each student in the class over a period of time. This instrument can be used to observe individual students, groups of students, or all the students in a class.

· Student's name is recorded in each rectangle

· At designated times, the observer records the behavior of each student: A= On Task

B= Out of seat

C= Talking to a classmate

D= Playing around

E= Out of the room


· The mentor and the mentee are encouraged to modify the meaning of each letter.

On the next post we will share a Sample Teacher to Student and Student to Student Verbal Flow Form.

Thursday, June 11, 2009

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

The MOFET JTEC online Jewish Portal of Teacher Education Adds This Blog As a Resource on Mentoring


Suggested Methods to Encourage Your Mentee To Participate in Collegial Reflection Practices




As we have discussed in a previous post, it is neither sufficient nor effective to simply review the above external reflection formats and protocols with your mentee. We would offer the following suggestions:

1. Invite your mentee to attend and observe the collegial reflection meetings, seminars, and workshops in which you participate.

2. Use the Novice Teacher Self-Assessment Inventory as a needs assessment for your pre-service and in-service mentee.

3. Pose strategic questions that activate, and expand mentee thinking during your professional conversations.

4. Establish regular weekly professional conversations among the mentor teachers and mentees at your school, or in your geographical area. These professional conversations can also take place online.

5. Implement the New Teacher Group Problem-Solving Protocol, or the Tuning Protocol at your school, in your geographical area, or via a list serve.

6. Use the examination of student work as a vehicle for external reflection.

On the next post we will present a summary of the external reflection professional practices discussed in this blog.

Tuesday, June 9, 2009

Jewish New Teacher Project Power Point Presentation


http://peje.wikispaces.com/file/view/312_PEJE+08+as+of+3+13.pdf View the above website and you will find a power point presentation on the Jewish New Teacher Project (JNTP). This power point presentation includes frames on these topics: history of the program, national retention data, the JNTP approach to instructional mentoring, formative and collaborative assessment, the impact of JNTP, data on why new teachers leave the profession, and other topics. 

Mentoring Program at the Community High School of (San Francisco) Bay




http://www.jchsofthebay.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=97&Itemid=105

 

On this website you will learn about the mentoring program of the Jewish Community High School (JCHS) of the (San Francisco) Bay.

 

 

Each student at JCHS is included in a mentor group comprised of 6-8 grade peers and one faculty member.  Mentor groups meet weekly throughout the students' 4 years at JCHS to ensure that each young adult forms relationships with both educators and peers that he or she can turn to for listening, advice or advocacy.  The role of the Faculty Mentor also comes into play during the scheduling process for the following year in assisting the student to select his or her courses.8 grade peers and one faculty member.  Mentor groups meet weekly throughout the students' 4 years at JCHS to ensure that each young adult forms relationships with both educators and peers that he or she can turn to for listening, advice or advocacy.  The role of the Faculty Mentor also comes into play during the scheduling process for the following year in assisting the student to select his or her courses.

Guidelines for Weekly Professional Conversations Among Mentor Teachers and Mentees




Guidelines for Weekly Professional Conversations

Among Mentor Teachers and Mentees  (*Rogers & Babinski, 1999)

 1. Make meetings voluntary and invitational

2. Survey the staff for interests

3. Begin on time

4. Post an agenda

5. Take minutes and distribute them to the entire staff

6. Read and discuss professional articles and books

7. Have a specific curricular focus

8. Encourage a knowledgeable teacher or co-teachers to facilitate the conversations

9. Request that the principal attend as a learner and equal group member

10. Allow time for the sharing of ideas




Rogers, D. L., & Babinski, L. (May, 1999). Breaking Through Isolation with New Teacher Groups.  Educational Leadership, 56(8), 38-40.

 

On the next post we will discuss suggested methods to encourage your mentee to participate in collegial reflection practices.

           

Monday, June 8, 2009

The Tuning Protocol Developed by Joseph McDonald and David Allen



The Tuning Protocol Developed by 

*Joseph McDonald and David Allen

 

 

Steps

Tuning Protocol Agenda

Minutes

1

Introduction

·      Facilitator briefly introduces protocol goals guidelines, and the schedule

·      Colleagues briefly introduce themselves

10

2

Teacher Presentation

·      Teacher describes the context for student work (classwork, homework, rubric, etc.)

·      Teacher poses a focus question to colleagues for their feedback

·      Colleagues listen

20

3

Clarifying questions

·    Colleagues ask clarifying questions only (no feedback is given at this time)

5

4

Examination of student work samples

·    Samples of original/photocopied student work are presented

·    Video clips of presentation may also be presented

15

5

Reflection on feedback to be shared

·    Colleagues silently pause to reflect upon the feedback they would like to share with the teacher/presenter

2-3

6

Colleagues share feedback

·    Colleagues share positive, negative, and corrective feedback; the teacher/presenter listens

·    Facilitator may remind colleagues of the teacher/presenter’s focus question (Step 2)

5

7

Teacher/presenter reflection

·      Teacher/presenter responds to the feedback shared by his or her colleagues

·      Facilitator may intervene to focus, clarify, etc.

·      Colleagues listen

15

8

Debriefing

·    Facilitator leads a discussion on the tuning experience: What was learned? What was helpful? What concerns were raised?

 

10

 

 

* See a more elaborate explanation of The Tuning Protocol at this website:http://www.nsrfharmony.org/protocol/doc/tuning.pdf

 

On the next post we will share reflection questions to guide the examination of student work (Blythe, et al., 2002).  

Jewish Education News Blog

Richard D. Solomon's Blog on Mentoring Jewish Students and Teachers

http://nextleveljewisheducation.blogspot.com/